How to build excellent relationships

I recently gave a training course on managing relationships at work  and thought it would be nice to adapt the section on the actions we can take to build relationships for this blog post.

It seems so obvious that having good working relationships  leads to higher productivity yet many people don’t make this direct link. Good relationships lead to more innovation and creativity at work as people feel confident enough to express themselves, time consuming, energy draining obstacles such as office politics and back stabbing are removed and of course, if you want to progress in your career, a good relationship with your boss is fundamental.

So what can we do to build better relationships at work? Here are some ideas.

Where does communication go wrong?

There’s no doubt – we all tend to take communication for granted. But as George Bernard Shaw pointed out, “The problem with communication… is the illusion that it has been accomplished.” We believe it to be a straightforward process and that when we say something the other person understands us fully and we, of course,…

What are the Six Human Needs and how do they relate to motivation?

We hear a lot these days about motivation, it seems to be the buzzword of the decade, and quite rightly so, highly motivated staff lead to engaged employees lead to a happier working environment lead to higher productivity!

However, the ‘sixty thousand dollar’ question always is ‘What actually motivates someone?’ There are many motivation theories out there but the one I want to highlight in this post is related to our basic needs as humans and what happens when they aren’t met.

In the 1950’s Maslow articulated the Hierarchy of Needs, outlining how our needs change as we evolve as a society and as an individual. A model related to this but with a somewhat different perspective is the Six Human Needs model popularized by Anthony Robbins.

Positivity every time!

Today is the first day of 2012.

It’s a beautiful sunny morning here in Madrid, an appropriate environment to look forward with anticipation to another year.

Some will say it’s going to be a difficult year, a year in which the economic crisis will cut more deeply, a year in which many people will experience genuine hardship.

Others will say that it’s a year in which such circumstances will provide us with the opportunity to get creative, to reflect on where our strengths are, to change our life’s direction towards that which really inspires us, to learn to be grateful for what we actually have, to value those relationships that nuture us and encourage us to be the best we can be.

The most effective feedback question you can ask

We are constantly receiving feedback in every area of our life either directly or indirectly, and this is essential; it tells us how we’re doing, and more importantly, where we can improve.

However, most people will not voluntarily give you feedback. If there are indeed areas where they think you can improve, they’ll be reluctant to tell you, wanting to avoid hurting your feelings or risk your disapproval.

To get honest, open feedback you will have to ask for it  and make it safe for the other person to give it to you.

The most powerful question you can ask in this arena is the following: